Example Course Offerings

List of 5 items.

  • Eighth Grade English

    Into Thin Air: “Adventure and Survival Literature” - In this class, students will journey to polar ice caps, sled the Iditarod, scale the peaks of Mt. Everest and Kilimanjaro, hike the Appalachian Trail and trek into the Outback. The stories, novels and plays studied will all involve the unknown—the expected and the unexpected —and explore the nature of challenge. What does it take to face a challenge—luck, special knowledge, or a bit of both? What defines success? Students will explore true-life adventures in literature and film, and then prepare to imaginatively enter fictional world and even create adventures of their own which are physical and cerebral.
  • Lang & Lit: Non-Fiction

    The Language & Literature course aims to draw students’ focus to a critical study of language in all of its many forms and the cultural contexts that produce and consume it. In the first year of the two-year course, students study non-fiction texts—including essays, speeches, journalism, and advertising—and examine the impact that evolving cultures have on the uses of language as a means of communication within and among those cultures. In their senior year, students incorporate fiction literary works into their curriculum, studying novels, short stories, poetry, and drama from a wide array of regions and time periods, allowing them to closely examine the relationship between a literary text and its cultural context. Junior/Senior course
  • World Literature Honors

    Honors World Literature is a challenging course for the motivated student of literature. This course focuses on texts written by international authors on subjects of international significance. Students learn about writing and the world around them by examining the texts read for their mechanics of storytelling as well as for their cultural-historical contexts. Active discussion leadership is required of students in this class. Students complete critical expository essays and creative narratives, both fiction and non-fiction, including their own historical-fiction narrative based on independent research completed at Yale University. Sophomore course
  • International Baccalaureate English Language and Literature

    The IB English Language and Literature course aims to draw students’ focus to a critical study of language in all of its many forms and the cultural contexts that produce and consume it. In the first year of the two-year course, students study non-fiction texts—including essays, speeches, journalism, and advertising—and examine the impact that evolving cultures have on the uses of language as a means of communication within and among those cultures. In their senior year, students incorporate fiction literary works into their curriculum, studying novels, short stories, poetry, and drama from a wide array of regions and time periods, allowing them to closely examine the relationship between a literary text and its cultural context. Students complete assessments required by the IB programme, including written tasks, oral presentations, and two course-culminating exams; the preparation for these assessments begins in the fall of their junior year and continues throughout the rest of the course, in the practice of close reading analyses, reading responses, formal literary criticism, oral presentations, and other creative projects. The rigor and discipline of the IB English course challenges and serves the students who take it, preparing them with the content and the skills they will need and use in the future. Junior/Senior course
  • English I (IS)

    English I for International Students is designed to bridge the gap between a student who has studied the English language and literature to a student who uses English fluently in the process of critically examining literature at the ninth grade level. Students acquire new vocabulary, discuss key points of literature in class, write essays and creative pieces, and create interactive projects to promote a deeper understanding of the subject matter. Students examine the theme of “survival” throughout the year. They begin with selected short stories, move on to a short novel, explore poetry forms in a novel format, and finish the year with two more novels. The genre varies from non-fiction to sci-fi/fantasy, but ‘survival’ features prominently in all of the works. Students take weekly quizzes on vocabulary and the text, and students perform on tests associated with each unit. Students create and perform their own poetry, and they learn the basic format of the essay. After students finish the short stories, they write one of their own. As students read “My Side of the Mountain,” they choose a skill which they will study, research, perform, and report. Freshman course

Department Faculty

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Cheshire Academy
10 Main Street
Cheshire, Connecticut 06410

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ADMISSIONS OFFICE: 203-439-7290
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About Cheshire Academy

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  • The student-centered private school in CT

    Cheshire Academy is a boarding school in Connecticut that challenges students in grades 9-12 and Post Grad to discover and hone their unique talents. This college preparatory school offers personalized learning opportunities like the Roxbury Academic Support Program and the IB Program. Artists can benefit from the Art Major program, while high school athletes can benefit from competitive athletics. Overall, students at the private school are encouraged to become culturally sensitive and internationally minded, and develop the critical thinking skills, confidence, and character that enable them to succeed in college and as citizens of a global society. 
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